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Annual Report 2013
04 July 2014 by HD Centre

2013 was a defining year for the organisation as it formally set out its principles and operational standards in a new Charter. The ten-point list, which is included in this Annual Report, reflects the role the HD Centre has developed over more than a decade in international peacemaking and provides a ‘moral compass’ to steer the organisation’s work in the future. The Annual Report also highlights the HD Centre’s progress in the difficult task of defining the impact of its operational work. In addition, it captures the organisation’s contribution to some significant successes including steps towards peace in the Philippines, peaceful elections in Kenya and a local peace agreement in Libya.

Mediation Practice Series - Conflict analysis: the foundation for effective action
03 July 2014 by Konrad Huber

Attempting to resolve armed conflicts is generally a highly uncertain undertaking in which third parties can have a decisive role. Within the framework of their interventions, third parties can significantly improve the effectiveness of their interventions through solid up-to-date and ongoing conflict analysis.

In Conflict analysis: the foundation for effective action, the fifth publication in the Mediation Practice Series, Konrad Huber explains why and how conflict analysis can be instrumental in supporting third parties. He introduces seven key components that can usefully inform a rigorous practical approach to conflict analysis. Those building blocks are: the context, the actors, the process design and sequencing, the issues of negotiations, the comparative practice, and the implementation roadblocks.

The Mediation Practice Series is a collection of short publications which seek to provide mediation practitioners with insight into how challenges have been addressed by others in order to help them prepare for the demands of mediation. The series draws on feedback from mediators and their teams and aims to address the lack of adequate reference material and insight into other peace processes available in this field.

Mediation Practice Series - Broadening participation in peace processes
01 July 2014 by Thania Paffenholz

Broadening participation in peace processes will ensure more sustainable peace agreements. However, a broader participation in negotiations also represents an additional challenge for mediators as it complicates negotiations further. Understanding on how to benefit from a broader participation without reducing the effectiveness of a peace process and the resulting accord thus needs to be improved.

In Broadening participation in peace processes, the fourth publication in the Mediation Practice Series, Thania Paffenholz provides mediators and their teams with a better understanding of the benefits of a broader participations as well as options on how to go about it without sacrificing the process’ effectiveness. The publication covers key points including who to include in processes, why  broadening participation matters, opportunities and value added, potential challenges and how to address those, as well as practical models of participation.

The Mediation Practice Series is a collection of short publications which seek to provide mediation practitioners with insight into how challenges have been addressed by others in order to help them prepare for the demands of mediation. The series draws on feedback from mediators and their teams and aims to address the lack of adequate reference material and insight into other peace processes available in this field.

Effectively supporting mediation - Developments, challenges and requirements
19 June 2014 by Stine Lehmann-Larsen

Mediation is today recognised as an efficient and cost-effective tool to peacefully address and resolve a broad range of conflicts. Mediation and the management of peace processes also come with their own challenges however, thus requiring substantial professional support to be effective.  Recent developments indicate a growing awareness of the need for mediation support, including among practitioners. This had led to policy changes in United Nations and among regional organisations. This publication examines what mediation support entails and how it can be improved. While acknowledging that mediation is a complicated and difficult endeavour whose outcomes are dependent on a wide number of variables, it argues in favour of strengthened international capacities to support mediation and provides analysis on how mediation is effectively supported. It outlines the areas where there is still space for improvement, to ensure that mediation is effectively supported, to raise awareness of the positive impact of mediation support, and to share lessons about mediation-support options and experiences. It concludes that while success can never be guaranteed, effective well-supported mediation processes offer a better chance of sustainable settlements.

Effectively supporting mediation is the third paper in the Oslo Forum Papers series. The Oslo Forum Papers seek to advance thinking and debate on key, yet sensitive, issues linked to armed conflict mediation and international peacemaking.